El Salvador – Observaciones Comité Derechos de la Mujer/2017

United Nations CEDAW/C/SLV/CO/8-9

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women

Distr.: General

3 March 2017

ADVANCE UNEDITED VERSION

Original: English

Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women

Concluding observations on the combined eighth and ninth periodic reports of El Salvador*

  1. The Committee considered the combined eighth and ninth periodic reports of El Salvador (CEDAW/C/SLV/8-9) in its 1478th and 1479th meetings (see CEDAW/C/SR.1478 and 1479) held on 17 February 2017. The Committee’s list of issues and questions is contained in CEDAW/C/SLV/Q/8-9 and the responses of the State party are contained in CEDAW/C/SLV/Q/8-9/Add.1.
  2. Introduction
  3. The Committee appreciates the submission by the State party of its combined eighth and ninth periodic reports. It also appreciates the State party’s written replies to the list of issues and questions raised by the pre-sessional working group and welcomes the oral presentation by the delegation and the further clarifications provided in response to the questions posed orally by the Committee during the dialogue.
  4. The Committee commends the State party’s multi-sectoral delegation, which was headed by His Excellency Mr. Carlos Castaneda Magaña, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs of El Salvador. The delegation also included the First Vice-President of the Legislative Assembly, the Permanent Representative of El Salvador to the United Nations at Geneva, the Head of the Salvadoran Institute for the Advancement of Women (ISDEMU), and representatives of the Ministry of Health, the Salvadoran Institute of Agrarian Transformation, the ISDEMU and the Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the United Nations at Geneva.
  5. Positive Aspects
  6. The Committee welcomes the progress achieved since the consideration in 2008 of the State party’s seventh periodic report (CEDAW/C/SLV/7) in undertaking legislative reforms, in particular the adoption of:

(a)          The Law to Promote, Protect and Support Maternal Breast Feeding, in June 2016;

(b)          The Law on Equality, Equity and Elimination of Discrimination against Women, in 2016 and the Law on the Comprehensive Protection of Children and Adolescents (LEPINA), in April 2009, which mandates the Ministry of Education to provide education on gender, reproductive health and discrimination against women in the educational system;

(c)          The Law on the Promotion, Protection and Development of Micro-Enterprises and Small Businesses, in 2014, which aims to promote greater access by women to entrepreneurial development;

(d)          The Special Law against Trafficking in Persons, in 2014;

(e)          The Law on a Violence-Free Life for Women (LIEV), in 2012.

  1. The Committee welcomes the State party’s efforts to improve its institutional and policy framework aimed at accelerating the elimination of discrimination against women and promoting gender equality, such as the adoption of the following:

(a)          The Pact on the Defence of Civil and Political Rights of Women, in 2014;

(b)          The National System for Substantive Equality (SNIS) and its National Plan, in 2013;

(c)          The System of Statistics and Monitoring for Equality (SEMI), in 2013;

(d)          The National Policy for Women’s Access to a Life Free of Violence, in 2013, and its 2013-2015 and 2016 – 2020 National Plans;

(e)          The Plan “El Salvador Seguro”, in 2015, which addresses gender-based violence;

(f)           The National Plan for Equality and Equity for Salvadoran Women, in 2012;

(g)          The Sexual and Reproductive Health Policy, in August 2012, which focuses on awareness raising on family planning methods and comprises a section specifically addressing adolescent health;

(h)          The Strategic Plan on Reduction of Infant and Maternal Mortality 2011 – 2014, in 2011.

  1. The Committee welcomes the fact that, in the period since the consideration of the previous report, the State party has ratified or acceded to the following international and regional instruments:

(a)          The Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons, in February 2015;

(b)          The Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child concerning a communications procedure, in February 2015;

(c)          The Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, in February 2015.

  1. Parliament
  2. The Committee stresses the crucial role of the legislative power in ensuring the full implementation of the Convention (see the statement by the Committee on its relationship with parliamentarians, adopted at the forty-fifth session, in 2010). It invites the Legislative Assembly, in line with its mandate, to take the necessary steps regarding the implementation of the present concluding observations between now and the next reporting period under the Convention.
  3. Principal areas of concern and recommendations

Ratification of the Optional Protocol

  1. The Committee welcomes efforts of the government to reiterate the request to the National Assembly to ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention. It is however concerned at difficulties faced in the ratification of the Optional Protocol.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party expedite the ratification of the Optional Protocol to the Convention.

Institutional and legal framework

  1. The Committee welcomes efforts of the State party to adopt or revise laws, programmes and plans to combat discrimination against women and promote their rights. It is however concerned at insufficient articulation between legal instruments and limited coordination between institutions in charge of implementation.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party systematically harmonize its national legislation with the Convention and ensure institutional coordination for its enforcement between the legislative, executive and judicial branches.

Access to justice

  1. The Committee welcomes the establishment of specialized jurisdiction for crimes against women and specialized institutional support units for women in the police. The Committee is further concerned about patriarchal stereotypes among the judiciary and law enforcement personnel, and bottlenecks in the implementation of the Law on a Violence-Free Life of Women.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party, in line with General recommendation No. 33 (2015) on women’s access to justice:

(a)          Allocate adequate human, technical and financial resources to enable effective operation of the newly-created special jurisdiction on crimes against women;

(b)          Reinforce the capacities of the National Civil Police, the Office of the Procurator-General, and the Institute of Forensic Medicine for the application of protocols and for monitoring their implementation;

(c)          Systematically harmonize all legislation with the Act on Violence-Free Life of Women and with the Convention;

(d)          Monitor the implementation of the Law on Equality, Equity and Discrimination against Women and strengthen the capacity of judges, lawyers and law enforcement officials on the gender equality framework, including the meaning and scope of direct and indirect discrimination.

Women, peace and security / Peace Agreements

  1. The Committee welcomes the creation of the National Committee for implementing Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions on women, peace and security and the decision on unconstitutionality of the 1993 Amnesty Law by the Supreme Court. However, the Committee is concerned that this may not lead to adequate reparation and compensation to women who suffered violations of their rights during and after the armed conflict.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Provide women victims of the armed conflict with reparation measures;

(b)          Establish a clear timeframe for the development of the draft National Action Plan (NAP) to implement Security Council Resolution No. 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security, in cooperation with women’s organizations.

Women human rights defenders

  1. The Committee welcomes efforts to protect and support all women human rights defenders but remains concerned about harassment and discrimination, violence and the assassination of women’s human rights defenders and the lack of prosecution in many of these cases.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Expedite the investigation and prosecution of all acts of harassment and discrimination, violence and the assassination of women human rights defenders, offer remedies and reparation to victims and establish a registry of such incidents at the Public Attorney’s Office;

(b)          Raise awareness on the contribution of women human rights defenders to the realization of women’s rights and take the necessary legislative and practical measures to ensure prevention of attacks and threats, and to provide protection for women human rights defenders;

(c)          Enhance collaboration between ISDEMU and networks of women human rights defenders.

National machinery for the advancement of women

  1. The Committee commends the progress made in the allocation of human, technical and financial resources for the Salvadoran Institute for the Advancement of Women (ISDEMU), its participation in Cabinet meetings, and the development of a draft bill to strengthen its leading role for the advancement of women. The Committee also welcomes the reinforcement of the Women’s City (Ciudad Mujer) Programme, which is part ofthe Ministry of Social Inclusion. However, the Committee remains concerned that the human, technical and financial resources allocated to the ISDEMU are not commensurate with its increasing responsibilities in terms of monitoring and coordination. The Committee also notes the increased budgetary needs for the accelerated implementation of Sustainable Development Goals. The Committee is further concerned that the responsibility of ISDEMU in the area of data collection has not been fully implemented to date, despite the proposal of a National System of Gender Statistics.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Expedite the adoption of legislation reinforcing the leading role of the Salvadoran Institute for the Advancement of Women (ISDEMU);

(b)          Enforce implementation of gender-responsive budgeting for government bodies;

(c)          Continue strengthening ISDEMU by providing it with the necessary human, technical and financial resources to ensure the effective coordination and implementation of public policies for the advancement of women, and in particular to fulfil its mandate in the area of data collection.

Temporary special measures

  1. The Committee notes the introduction of a temporary quota on electoral lists for popularly elected positions in political parties in 2013. However, it remains concerned at the lack of an overall strategy for using temporary special measures to attain substantive gender equality in all areas of the Convention.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party continue to take concrete measures, including temporary special measures, in accordance with General Recommendation No 25, and to establish concrete goals and timetables in order to accelerate the increase in the representation of women in all spheres of public life, especially in local decision making positions, and in high levels of diplomatic services. Particular attention should be paid to participation of indigenous women.

Stereotypes

  1. The Committee welcomes efforts made by the State party to eliminate patriarchal attitudes and deeply rooted stereotypes. However, the Committee remains concerned at the pervasiveness of such attitudes regarding the roles and responsibilities of women and men in the family and social life, which are reflected in the media.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Develop a comprehensive and wide ranging strategy across all sectors to eliminate discriminatory stereotypes, working with a broad range of stakeholders, including women’s organizations;

(b)          Take all appropriate measures to raise awareness, together within the media and the advertising sector, with the aim of eliminating gender stereotypes and promoting objective images of women actively participating in social, cultural, economic and political life.

Gender-based violence against women

  1. The Committee welcomes the introduction of a legislative and policy framework aiming to guarantee a life free of violence for all women, as well as the creation of an institutional framework for its implementation. The Committee is however concerned at the:

(a)          Insufficient resources allocated to the implementation of the Law for a Violence-Free Life of Women,  especially in light of the increasing rates of feminicide and high rates of domestic violence and sexual violence against women and adolescent girls in the State party;

(b)          Lack of information on how cases of domestic violence are adjudicated;

(c)          Low number of prosecutions in cases of violence against women and feminicides and at the even lower number of convictions;

(d)          Limited application of the Protocol for the Investigation of Feminicide and limited enforcement of protection orders, as well as the preference given to victims’ reconciliation with perpetrators;

(e)          Insufficient protection, support, recovery, and social reintegration mechanisms for women victims of gender-based violence;

(f)           Limited efforts made for protection and recovery of women and girl victims of gang violence and their families in the current national security plan (Plan El Salvador Seguro; PESS), especially considering the link of gender-based violence to criminal gang activities.

  1. Taking into account the Committee’s general recommendation No. 19 (1992) on violence against women, the Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Allocate sufficient human, technical and financial resources to the implementation of the Policy and Action Plans for Women’s Access to a Life Free of Violence and monitor their implementation (CEDAW/C/SLV/CO/7, para. 24);

(b)          Collect data on the treatment of domestic violence cases from the time of reporting until the final judgement, and study the impact and effectiveness of the mechanisms for addressing such cases;

(c)          Expedite the development of protocols for the implementation of the Law for a Violence-Free Life of Women (art. 56 LEIV), which guarantee the application of a victim-oriented approach and the due diligence principle;

(d)          Strengthen the capacity of judges, lawyers and law enforcement personnel on the strict application of the Law for a Violence-Free Life of Women, the Law for Comprehensive Protection of Children and Adolescents and their corresponding implementation guidelines;

(e)          Reinforce the protection, support, recovery, and social reintegration of women and girls who are victims of gender-based violence, and especially women victims of domestic violence;

(f)           Attend to the specific needs of internally displaced and deported girls, women and their families, in terms of protection from all forms of violence, especially those related to gangs.

Trafficking and sexual exploitation

  1. The Committee welcomes the provisions for the protection of women victims of trafficking contained in the Law on a Violence-Free Life for Women, as well as the conclusion of bilateral and multilateral cooperation agreements on the prosecution of traffickers and protection of victims. It also notes the establishment of a shelter for victims of trafficking. The Committee is however alarmed at reports of sexual exploitation of young women and girls by criminal gangs under threats of homicide against them and their families. It remains concerned at the absence of a strategy for protecting women and girls from trafficking and sexual exploitation and to reintegrate victims. The Committee is also concerned at the insufficient efforts to monitor and fight trafficking and sexual exploitation, as well as the lack of investigations into cases of trafficking in women and girls and the very low number of prosecutions and convictions of perpetrators.
  2. The Committee reiterates its previous concluding observation (CEDAW/C/SLV/CO/7, para. 26) and recommends that the State party:

(a)          Develop a comprehensive strategy and plan of action to prevent and combat trafficking and sexual exploitation of women and girls, with particular attention to gang-related victimization;

(b)          Include in such a strategy preventive and protective programmes and measures for the rehabilitation and social integration of trafficking victims;

(c)          Provide in its next periodic report data on trafficking, exploitation of prostitution of women and girls, the number of prosecutions and convictions in trafficking and sexual exploitation cases, as well as on the impact of the measures taken to combat these phenomena.

  1. The Committee notes with concern that legislation on trafficking is indiscriminately applied to women autonomously working in prostitution, giving rise to discriminatory treatment by local law enforcement personnel. The Committee is also concerned at reports of discrimination by health personnel against women engaged in prostitution.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party:
  3. a) Prohibit any discriminatory treatment of women by local law enforcement personnel in municipalities;
  4. b) Develop a protocol for health services that ensure non-discriminatory treatment for all women, and with adequate monitoring of its application.

Participation in political and public life

  1. The Committee notes the adoption of the Pact for Defence of Civil and Political Rights of Women (Pacto por la Defensa de los Derechos Civiles y Políticos de las Mujeres) and campaigns to raise awareness about women’s rights. It welcomes the draft law on parity, currently under discussion in the National Assembly, as well as the amendment to the Political Parties Law, which introduces a temporary 30% quota for women on electoral lists, and the consequent increase in women’s representation in the Legislative Assembly to 32.1% since 2015. However, the Committee notes that only 10.3% of mayors and 23.1% of ministers are women.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party continue efforts to reach parity in all institutions, including expansion of the use of special measures as deemed necessary to promote women’s representation in local governments, the executive branch, parliament and in diplomatic service. In this regard, particular attention should be granted to women facing multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination.

Education

  1. The Committee welcomes amendment to the Act on the Teaching Profession, introducing punishment for sexual harassment and abuse. The Committee is however concerned at:

(a)          Low school attendance of girls, and reports indicating a high rate of absenteeism due to adolescent pregnancies;

(b)          Limited training for teaching staff on Comprehensive Sexual Education;

(c)          Reports of gangs using schools as place of forcible recruitment and of parents preventing girls from attending school in order to protect them from such violence;

(d)          Persistent literacy discrepancies between men and women, and especially between rural and urban areas;

(e)          Low diversification of academic and vocational choices for girls, including low availability of flexible education schemes in rural areas.

  1. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Put into place a mechanism for monitoring newly adopted legislation prohibiting and punishing discrimination of pregnant girls, as well as sexual harassment and abuse of girls in school. This should be accompanied with  dissemination of information to students and parents on the right to remain in and to be reintegrated into school when during and/or following pregnancy.

(b)          Strengthen the capacity of teaching staff for in Comprehensive Sexual Education and continue strengthening age-appropriate school-based education on sexual and reproductive health and rights for adolescent girls and boys through the family life education curriculum, in line with the Committee’s previous concluding observations (CEDAW/C/SLV/CO/7, para 36);

(c)          Ensure safety for girls from violence and recruitment into criminal gangs in schools so as to prevent them from dropping out from school;

(d)          Strengthen efforts to eradicate illiteracy, particularly among women and girls in rural areas;

(e)          Ensure equal access of girls and young women to all levels of education and intensify efforts aimed at diversifying their academic and vocational choices.

Employment

  1. The Committee welcomes the creation of a mechanism to register domestic workers in the social security system, as well as the creation of a monitoring mechanism for women’s labour rights in the Maquila Industry. The Committee is however concerned at:

(a)          Gender segregation of labour, low female participation in the labour force, concentration of women in the informal sector, a salary gap between women and men;

(b)          The limited number of domestic workers who are formally registered so as to access social security, as well as the lack of ratification of the ILO Convention No. 189 (2011) on decent work for domestic workers;

(c)          Paucity of information on the efficiency of the monitoring mechanism in the detection of violations of women’s labour rights in the Maquila Industry;

(d)          Reports of employers requesting proof of HIV and pregnancy status during recruitments.

  1. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Introduce specific measures to create formal employment opportunities for women and effectively monitor the implementation of legislation guaranteeing equal pay for work of equal value, in line with general recommendation 13 (1989) on equal remuneration for work of equal value and the Committee’s previous concluding observations;

(b)          Increase efforts to register women domestic workers and expedite ratification of the International Labour Organisation Convention No. 189 (2011) concerning decent work for domestic workers;

(c)          Reinforce and expand workplace inspections and conduct studies on working conditions and the respect of women’s labour rights in the Maquila industry;

(d)          Monitor the implementation of legislation prohibiting compulsory pregnancy testing and HIV/AIDS screening as a condition of employment.

Health

  1. The Committee welcomes the preparation of a draft Law on Sexual and Reproductive Health in December 2016, the development of a strategy aiming to reduce adolescent pregnancies, the introduction of the Comprehensive and Integrated Health-Service Networks and efforts made for 24/7 availability of reproductive health services at most maternity clinics. It notes that these actions have increased prenatal visits  pregnancies and expanded institutional coverage, leading to a significant decrease in maternal mortality. While noting the numerous efforts to enhance women’s and girls’ access to reproductive health services, including the Young Women’s City Programme (Ciudad Mujer Jóven), the Committee remains concerned at the limited impact of these measures, especially in view of high fertility rates and early pregnancy rates among adolescent girls. The Committee is moreover concerned at the stigmatization of women in prostitution and women living with HIV/AIDS who seek sexual and reproductive health services.
  2. In line with its general recommendation No. 24 (1999) on women and health, the Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Expedite the adoption of the Law on Sexual and Reproductive Health and a strategy aiming to reduce adolescent pregnancies;

(b)          Strengthen measures to ensure access for girls, adolescents and women, including those living in rural areas, to adequate sexual and reproductive health services, including modern contraceptive methods and family planning, giving special attention to the prevention of early pregnancies and unsafe abortions and to appropriate education on sexual and reproductive health rights and responsible sexual behaviour;

(c)          Carry out a comprehensive analysis on the access to sexual and reproductive health services and contraception, gathering information on the impact of programmes to reduce and prevent pregnancy among adolescent girls for inclusion in its next periodic report;

(d)          Raise awareness within health service networks on the need to de-stigmatize women seeking sexual and reproductive health services, especially women engaged in prostitution and women living with HIV / AIDS.

Abortion

  1. The Committee is concerned about the absolute criminalization of abortion, according to article 133 of the Penal Code and about women often resorting to unsafe methods of abortion, thus facing serious risk to health and life. The Committee is also concerned at:

(a)          Prosecution of women for abortion, long periods in pre-trial detention and disproportionate criminal penalties applied to women seeking abortion, but also to women having had a miscarriage;

(b)         Incarceration of women just after having gone to the hospital in need of care due to health personnel reporting them to authorities due to a fear of being themselves penalized.

  1. The Committee recommends that the State party review article 133 of the Penal Code to legalize abortion, at least in cases of rape, incest, threats to the life and/or health of the pregnant woman, or severe foetal impairment. The Committee reiterates its previous concluding observations and encourages the State party to:

(a)          Introduce a moratorium on the enforcement of the current law and review the detention of women for abortion-related offenses, with the aim of ensuring their release and upholding the presumption of innocence and due process in abortion-related proceedings;

(b)          Ensure that professional secrecy for all health personnel and confidentiality for patients are guaranteed.

Women’s economic empowerment

  1. The Committee welcomes capacity building on women’s entrepreneurial skills through the Women’s City Programme, especially in non-traditional occupations and the economic initiatives given through the Financial Fund of the Ministry of Economy and the Women’s Bank programme (Programa Banca Mujer) of the National Development Bank. The Committee is however concerned at:

(a)          Limited coverage and insufficient funding for initiatives supporting women’s economic autonomy and sustainable income;

(b)          Women continuing to spend three times more than men on domestic work;

(c)       The lack of child care facilities.

  1. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Study the allocation of funding through the Financial Fund and the Women’s Bank Programme, and reinforce these mechanisms in order to better support sustainable women’s economic empowerment;

(b)          Raise awareness among women and men about their equal family responsibilities, encouraging men to participate equally in child rearing and household responsibilities and introducing flexible working hours for women and men in both the public and private sectors;

(c)           Provide adequate childcare facilities throughout the State party.

Rural women

  1. The Committee welcomes the development of a National Plan for Rural Women, as well as efforts made to improve basic infrastructure in rural areas. The Committee is, however, concerned at disparities between urban and rural areas in access to education, health services and employment, which has a disproportionate impact on rural women. The Committee also regrets the lack of comprehensive data on rates of illiteracy, employment, access to health and information about rural areas. Noting efforts made to guarantee access of women’s agricultural associations to loans at preferential rates, the Committee is concerned that only 20% of beneficiaries of the programme of the Agricultural Development Bank are women.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Expedite the adoption of a comprehensive national plan for rural women that addresses the structural problems that rural women continue to face;

(b)          Provide extensive information and statistical data on the situation of rural women in its next periodic report;

(c)          Introduce temporary special measures in the selection of women beneficiaries for loans at preferential rates, so as to reinforce its contribution to the economic empowerment of rural women.

Lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex women

  1. The Committee notes amendments to the Penal Code increasing the penalties for hate crimes based on sexual orientation and gender identity, as indicated in Articles 129 and 155 of the Penal Code, and the introduction of a Helpline and a dedicated space for security and access to justice for these women. However, the Committee is concerned at the increasing number of harassment cases, threats, intimidation and violence against LBTI women, including by law enforcement officials. The Committee is also concerned at the high vulnerability of LBTI women to gang violence, and at reports of violence directed at their families, partners, employers and customers.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Put in place mechanisms to ensure the enforcement of legislation against discrimination by law enforcement officials, prosecute hate crimes based on sexual orientation and gender identity, and ensure through monitoring that such cases are duly investigated and adequately punished;

(b)          Intensify efforts to combat discrimination against women based on their sexual orientation and gender identity, including efforts to sensitize general public, and ensure continuous capacity building for law enforcement officials and health service providers.

Indigenous women

  1. The Committee welcomes the 2014 amendment to the Constitution, recognizing the existence of indigenous populations and takes note of the development of a draft Law on Indigenous Peoples and a National Plan for Indigenous Peoples. The Committee is, however, concerned at the lack of data on the situation of indigenous women.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party expedite the adoption of the Law on Indigenous Peoples, ensure a gender-perspective in the National Plan for Indigenous Peoples and introduce the category of indigenous peoples for the planned 2017 census.

Women in detention

  1. The Committee welcomes the provision of health services to women in detention. The Committee is however concerned at lengthy pre-trial detention periods, difficulties that women face in getting legal advice when in detention, and problems in gaining appropriate access to accommodation, health and sanitary facilities.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)          Reinforce efforts to guarantee due process for women in detention;

(b)          Ensure that conditions of women in detention facilities are in full accordance with international standards and the United Nations rules for the treatment of women prisoners and non-custodial measures for women offenders (the Bangkok Rules).

Child marriage

  1. The Committee is concerned that the Family Code recognizes early pregnancies as a reason to celebrate marriage before the age of 18, which illustrates insufficient harmonization of this Code with the Law for a Violence-Free Life for Women (LEIV). The Committee is also concerned at reports of the social acceptance of sexual and marital relations of children and teenagers with older men.
  2. The Committee recommends that the State party expedite its reform of the Family Code, abrogating exceptions to the minimum age of 18 for marriage, thereby bringing it into line with article 16, para. 2 of the Convention. The Committee further recommends awareness-raising on negative implications of early marriage for the health and education of girls.

Amendment to article 20 (1) of the Convention

  1. The Committee encourages the State party to accept, as soon as possible, the amendment to article 20 (1) of the Convention concerning the meeting time of the Committee.

Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action

  1. The Committee calls upon the State party to use the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, in its efforts to implement the provisions of the Convention.

2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

  1. The Committee welcomes objectives of accelerated implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and calls for the realization of substantive gender equality, in accordance with the provisions of the Convention, throughout this process.

Dissemination

  1. The Committee requests the State party to ensure the timely dissemination of the present concluding observations, in the official language(s) of the State party, to the relevant State institutions at all levels (national, regional, local), in particular to the Government, the ministries, Parliament and the judiciary, to enable their full implementation

Follow-up to concluding observations

  1. The Committee requests the State party to provide, within two years, written information on the steps taken to implement the recommendations contained in paragraphs 13 (a) and (b) and 17 (a) and (c) above.

Preparation of the next report

  1. The Committee invites the State party to submit its tenth periodic report in March 2021. In case of delay, the report should cover the entire period up to the time of its submission.
  2. The Committee requests the State party to follow the harmonized guidelines on reporting under the international human rights treaties, including guidelines on a common core document and treaty-specific documents (see HRI/GEN/2/Rev.6, chap. I).

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